Zoom Focus 2014: Double Discrimination

Watch Rinkoo Barpaga's thought-provoking documentary about racism in the Deaf community, made as part of our Zoom Focus 2014 scheme.

Documentary. Rinkoo Barpaga investigates Deaf people's experiences of racism, including leading figures in the Deaf community, in Double Discrimination. This is Barpaga's first documentary, and it was made as part of the BSL Zone's filmmaking scheme, Zoom Focus 2014. This film was produced by Neath Films.

Watch all of our Zoom and Zoom Focus films by new Deaf filmmakers by clicking here.

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  • Remember whites are not the only ones who have been racist by other races in the Deaf community.
    Posted on
    150922
  • Look forward to discussing this with friends, full of lots of information.
    Posted on
    150901
  • this should be voiced over
    Posted on
    150428
  • We have same problem in America. We had a book called "Black and Deaf: Are we that Different Book". The authors themselves are Black and Deaf who discussed about same issues as your film discussed about. Thats great film. I will share your video on facebook!

    Greeting from US!
    Posted on
    150420
  • Wow it is thought provoking and finally some of us are telling our stories! We need to hear more so that people really believe us. It seems people want real hard evidence to totally believe it. Why is it so hard to hear or see it?! Unless you have been there you know and can see it. This is produced really clearly, very to the point and allow us wanting to know more. Can we live in a denial culture within a deaf community?! Great research and film! Thanks for sharing that I am no longer alone.
    Posted on
    150408
  • Hello my name is Ted, I went to a media networking/launch do recently where many in the Deaf 'media' community attended. There were no ethnic Deaf people there - 0%. I also think about the media teams and Deaf production companies in the UK and I can't think of anyone who has a 'full time' job who isn't white - with the exception of VS1 which is run by my friend David Ellington - Maybe I am wrong (I hope I am wrong!) but if I'm not, then this is quite remarkable having watched this documentary. You might think this is because there aren't many ethnic people working in media (within the Deaf community) or those who have studied media but that isn't the case. I know this because when I worked for a company (my first job in the media which was offered to me despite me having NO qualifications in media) under Bim Ajadi - we had a mixed group there. The director of this documentary, Rinkoo Barpaga, was also part of that team. I remember attending the Shuffle Festival last summer where I did a little talk and presented some films - this was a small event in Mile End (East London) - and the majority of Deaf people there were ethnic and from what I can remember, I was the only filmmaker there who occasionally works in Deaf media. I was chatting to a few people afterwards who were very interested in becoming involved in the media/filmmaking but there was a distinct impression that suggested they felt they weren't 'entitled' to the opportunities available or weren't confident about approaching those who make programmes or commission them. There ARE people out there who aren't getting the opportunities which are so open to others - I know a few of them personally. There is a huge loss of confidence - why is that? I'm not saying everyone who is white in the media is racist - that isn't the case at all. Those who do have job are talented and their roles are justified - but I just think we can all broaden our horizons bit more and present more opportunities towards those who are feeling marginalised. Let's engage more with everyone and if they are not coming to you - then go to them! Like the mainstream there is a tendency to give opportunities to people you know (friends/mutual friends or people who are connected to you in someway) - not everyone had the opportunity to go to a certain grammar school and that shouldn't automatically secure you a job or a certain opportunity either. Be open minded... I don't want to rant and just moan about it - I am hoping to organise training opportunities for Deaf people who are looking to become involved in filming/editing. I also plan to share my research into Deaf people/sign language on screen (once it is completed) and I hope anyone who is interested, whatever race or gender, will take part. Likewise, if my small company develops and I am able to employ more people - I hope everyone feels confident about approaching me. If we want to make a change then lets change it in our own environment - Maybe then things will improve and we will be the diverse and multicultural community we often pride ourselves to be.
    Posted on
    150408
  • I really enjoyed this documentary as I believe that is quite relevant and touches on some sensitive issues. There is widely held misassumption that because the Deaf community is a marginalized community, it embraces and celebrates diversity, understanding what it is like to be discriminated against in society. Experience has taught me that this is not the case. Sadly, there is a great deal of discrimination within the Deaf community, which moreover, tends to be unseen, as some Deaf people who belong to an ethnic minority want to belong to the Deaf community, and so they tolerate this behaviour. Others who don't often experience a "split" of a kind - torn between their ethnic values and their Deaf values. It is extremely hard to marry both values together, amplified considerably by "colour-blindness." There is not enough representation for ethnic minority groups within the Deaf community and it is sad to see the effects of that on Rinkoo's subjects in the documentary. Change is imperative.
    Posted on
    150407
  • Good...
    Posted on
    150407
  • I have used this website for the first time and watched Double Discrimination video. I am impressed by the experiences expressed, very positive from different perspectives, justifying the reasons behind the cause. I, myself am partially deaf is very open to discuss about any topics, including racisms with my deaf friends.
    Posted on
    150327
  • hello. I am impressed with rinkkoo execllent. I knowledge all white people doesn't understand our racism deaf people feel situation. BDA , remark doesn't have awareness as well.
    Posted on
    150326
  • Dear everyone,

    I am Joseph, from Spain. I like to share you my comment that this video about "Double Discrimination" is super and what you've done very well. This is very important for deaf to understand what it means racism. Well I'm glad and I will share this video for my country and other countries.

    I often see some videos on this website, are really excellent and so I love a lot. I wish you a future with many successful to continue making some new videos!

    Greetings from Spain

    José
    Posted on
    150326
  • I wanna to be a learn bsl
    Posted on
    150326
  • This is an incredibly brave attempt to start people talking about discrimination within the Deaf community. Discrimination has always been a problem within the community. Now in times of economic hardship people in both the deaf and hearing world are looking to blame someone for shortage of money employment etc. Organisations such as UKIP are trying to convince us that immigration is the cause, when clearly it is the fault of mismanagement of money by govts, banks and finanicial institutions. Opportunities to gain education are few within the deaf community and yet identity and a sense of who we are is incredibly important consequently we find people discriminating against each other because of their differences in colour, culture, religion etc Personally I have been discriminated against by Deaf signers because I am mainly oralist and am often told that I am 'not Deaf enough' to have an opinion on Deaf culture. Racism and all forms of bigotry that are used to alienate people is nothing more than ignorance and fear. People need to understand that the only way forward is to unite and challenge all forms of discrimination and hopefully this short film will help to make that happen.
    Posted on
    150326
  • Very well-scripted and relevant.
    A new classic for discussions and Deaf Studies.
    Looking forward to a DD sequel as well as opportunities for open forums on the subject.
    Deaf people deserve better!!
    Posted on
    150326
  • What a very interesting documentary. I myself are Asian deaf women but I do feel that, this programme have forgot to mention that deaf culture for example if I arrive Deaf Club for first time, of course everyone will say who I am and where I come from. And this is normal in the deaf community & deaf Asian community. If we are in hearing world, and we attending any type of community, of course regard their background, anyone will be curious who we are. And that is normal. I think there is more racism in show in the past compare now as it is more hidden. In the hearing world, they have diversity/culture awareness celebration each year. Why don't we have this in Deaf Community, so they can try out different food and clothing etc.
    Posted on
    150326
  • I have watch this clip and very obvious Discrimination and racism in deaf community. Racism and discrimination can be various, eg racism link colour skin and and culture with different background, discrimination link different level of education then become group, favourite and stereotype also barrier to deaf orgianarion for career. It wil still more difficult to solve the problem of discrimination and racism. We need all people put all together to campigan to stop discrimination and racism with evidences.
    Posted on
    150326

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